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thanks
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thanks
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thanks
WELCOME USS BATFISH AND USS OKLAHOMA AMATEUR RADIO CLUB - 01/07/15
              Hello and Welcome to the official website for WW2OK and WW2SUB callsigns.
The USS BATFISH SS-310 was begun when her keel was laid on 27  December 1942 at the Portsmouth Navy Yard, N.H. It was launched on 5  May 1943, Commissioned on 21 August 1943. After a shake down cruise it  passed thru the Panama Canal and on to Pearl Harbor. T.H. The Batfish  made seven wartime patrols sinking 14 ships (including 3 submarines in 76  hours) 37,080 tons of enemy shipping plus damage to 3 other ships (4500  tons damaged) and rescued 3 down airmen.  After WW2 the USS BATFISH was re-commisioned during Korean War &  the Cuban Missile Crisis, then served as a training submarine and then was  decommissioned again. In 1972 It was given to the city of Muskogee,  Oklahoma to be used as a memorial to members of the silent service. It was  slung between 2 barges to make its trip up the Mississippi river and then up  the Arkansas river (thru 16 locks) to the port of Muskogee (yes, Muskogee  is considered a deep water port for barge traffic up the Mississippi and  Arkansas river systems).  A slit was cut in the bank and the boat was nudged into the slit and closed  off from the Arkansas River. The water was drained from the slit and the  boat rested on the ground kept in position by heavy cables.   MUSEUM HOURS at The Memorial Park are 10am-6pm Wednesday thru  Saturday and Sundays Noon-6PM 
WELCOME TO 2015 AND CONGRATULATIONS TO ROYCE RAINWATER KE5TC OUR NEW CLUB PRESIDENT
Index page 2 page 3 page 4 Links Pics Contacts
CHECKOUT NEW PHOTO GALLERY AT: HTTP://GALLERY.WW2OK.ORG
Index page 2 page 3 page 4 Links Pics Contacts
MEETINGS ARE NORMALLY THE FIRST  SATURDAY EACH MONTH ON THE BATFISH AT 10AM
USS BATFISH AND USS OKLAHOMA AMATEUR RADIO CLUB - 09/05/14
              Hello and Welcome to the official website for WW2OK and WW2SUB callsigns.
The USS BATFISH SS-310 was begun when her  keel was laid on 27 December 1942 at the  Portsmouth Navy Yard, N.H. It was launched on 5  May 1943, Commissioned on 21 August 1943.  After a shake down cruise it passed thru the  Panama Canal and on to Pearl Harbor. T.H. The  Batfish made seven wartime patrols sinking 14  ships (including 3 submarines in 76 hours) 37,080  tons of enemy shipping plus damage to 3 other  ships (4500 tons damaged) and rescued 3 down  airmen.  After WW2 the USS BATFISH was re-  commisioned during Korean War & the Cuban  Missile Crisis, then served as a training submarine  and then was decommissioned again. In 1972 It  was given to the city of Muskogee, Oklahoma to be  used as a memorial to members of the silent  service. It was slung between 2 barges to make its  trip up the Mississippi river and then up the  Arkansas river (thru 16 locks) to the port of  Muskogee (yes, Muskogee is considered a deep  water port for barge traffic up the Mississippi and  Arkansas river systems).  A slit was cut in the bank and the boat was nudged  into the slit and closed off from the Arkansas River.  The water was drained from the slit and the boat  rested on the ground kept in position by heavy  cables.   MUSEUM HOURS at The Memorial Park are  10am-6pm Wednesday thru Saturday and Sundays  Noon-6PM
Home Page Page 3 Page 4 Links Gallery
CHECKOUT NEW PHOTO GALLERY AT: HTTP://GALLERY.WW2OK.ORG
Index page 2 page 3 page 4 Links Pics
MEETINGS ARE NORMALLY THE FIRST  SATURDAY EACH MONTH ON THE BATFISH AT 10AM
USS BATFISH AND USS OKLAHOMA AMATEUR RADIO CLUB - 09/05/14
              Hello and Welcome to the official website for WW2OK and WW2SUB callsigns.
The USS BATFISH SS-310 was begun when her keel  was laid on 27 December 1942 at the Portsmouth Navy  Yard, N.H. It was launched on 5 May 1943,  Commissioned on 21 August 1943. After a shake down  cruise it passed thru the Panama Canal and on to Pearl  Harbor. T.H. The Batfish made seven wartime patrols  sinking 14 ships (including 3 submarines in 76 hours)  37,080 tons of enemy shipping plus damage to 3 other  ships (4500 tons damaged) and rescued 3 down airmen.  After WW2 the USS BATFISH was re-commisioned  during Korean War & the Cuban Missile Crisis, then  served as a training submarine and then was  decommissioned again. In 1972 It was given to the city  of Muskogee, Oklahoma to be used as a memorial to  members of the silent service. It was slung between 2  barges to make its trip up the Mississippi river and then  up the Arkansas river (thru 16 locks) to the port of  Muskogee (yes, Muskogee is considered a deep water  port for barge traffic up the Mississippi and Arkansas  river systems).  A slit was cut in the bank and the boat was nudged into  the slit and closed off from the Arkansas River. The  water was drained from the slit and the boat rested on  the ground kept in position by heavy cables.   MUSEUM HOURS at The Memorial Park are 10am-  6pm Wednesday thru Saturday and Sundays Noon-  6PM
Home Page Page 3 Page 4 Links Gallery Contacts Index page 2 page 3 page 4 Links Pics Contacts
MEETINGS ARE NORMALLY THE FIRST  SATURDAY EACH MONTH ON THE BATFISH AT 10AM
Index page 2 page 3 page 4 Links Pics Contacts page 3
Volume1 Issue 3 June 2011
A Day in the Life:  Batfish Living History Day
Back in February, the Museum hosted the Oklahoma Historical Society’s “Batfish Living
History Association” (BLHA), which placed re
-
enactors on the boat, each working and telling a 
part of the story of a d
ay in the life of the World War Two Submariner. 
Our club in support of their 
activities manned the radio 
shack during the day. Gary 
W5ODS and myself both 
“dressed the part” to fit in 
with the crew. Gary operated
the radio and ran CW while I 
did mostly a
dministration 
duties like logging and
talking to visitors, which was 
kind of difficult as the radio 
operator sits between the 
guests in the door way, and
the second op position. This 
of course was a distraction to 
Gary, but we both had a lot of 
fun as that
 weekend was also 
the WWDX contest and Gary 
ended up working 50 to 60 contacts on CW, and about 30 to 40 different countries, all on CW.
It is my hope that we will continue to support the BLHA and the museum by providing CW 
operators for their events. So
me of us might even consider joining the BLHA as well. In 
following this direction of thinking, It is my hope that the “Sub Club” will get the original RAL 
and RAK receivers and at least the Collins TCS
-
8 Transmitter up and working, so that they may 
be use
d for these events. I 
know they are not 
practical for today’s SSB 
and Data communications 
that hams use today, But 
for CW, which is about 
all that was used at the 
time of WW2, they would
be just as good today, as 
they were in WWII. They 
were state of the a
rt back
then, and most still 
consider them good rigs 
for CW. 
Once the museum closed
down for the day, the 
activities continued but at 
a much more relaxed
Index page 2 page 3 page 4 Links Pics Contacts
pace. The first thing we did was eat dinner, which was prepared by the crew in the galley, during
th
e day. We were invited to join the BLHA dinner that evening, and I am glad that I accepted, as 
it was a special treat. Like all Submariners before, the BLHA crew knows how to enjoy a good
meal, and this one did not disappoint anyone. 
The dinner was made 
even more special when the crew ate in the crew’s mess on the boat. This 
one act, as simple as it seems, did more to place me in the mindset of what life must have been 
like for the men aboard these boats. You really learn that the guy next to you, no matt
er how
much you like, or dislike him, is an integral part of your life at every level. What it seems to 
bring out in everyone is a camaraderie that obviously builds lifelong relationships among the 
men that served onboard.
After Dinner, and its clean up,
 the 
BLHA relocated to the meeting
room of the museum and held a 
meeting that also doubled as a 
training seminar that I sat in on. I 
am glad I joined them as a era 
appropriate desert was severed, 
Orange Crush Floats! Ice cream 
and Orange Crush soda. I must
 say 
that I wasn’t sure about it when 
they first handed it to me, but I 
enjoyed it immensely, so much so 
that I now have a case of Orange 
Crush under the counter and a 
gallon of vanilla Ice cream in the 
freezer. 
Once desert was finished, we did a fire an
d safety walk through the boat, learning where the 
flashlights and fire extinguishers are, how to open and close the fire dampers in the ventilation 
duct through out the boat, as well as learning about all sorts of miscellaneous equipment onboard
the boat.
 It was good for me to take that walk, as it allowed me to identify a serious safety issue 
that our radio equipment was causing. 
It seems that when the original cabling was installed for the tower’s antenna rotor, it was run 
down the hallway over the off
icer’s quarters, and to get it though the bulkheads between 
compartments, the rotor cable was routed thought the ventilation ducts. The problem is that they 
were preventing the fire damper doors from closing. 
Shortly thereafter, the guys from the sub
-
clu
b removed the cable and re
-
run it on the outside of 
the boat, fixing the fire safety issue and it also cleaned up the control room and officer’s area 
considerable. At the very least, getting this cable moved, saved the cable from getting cut when 
someone t
ried to close the dampers. But this really could have been disastrous had there been a 
fire.
Later this summer the BLHA is expected to have yet another living history day at the boat, and I 
hope that you will volunteer to help out during the event. It mig
ht seem awkward at first, but you
will enjoy it.
Home Page Page 3 Page 4 Links USS BATFISH AND USS OKLAHOMA AMATEUR RADIO CLUB - 09/05/14 page 2
Volume1 Issue 3 June 2011
A Day in the Life:  Batfish Livi
Back in February, the Museum hosted the Oklahoma Historic
History Association” (BLHA), which placed re
-
enactors on t
part of the story of a d
ay in the life of the World War Two S
ended up working 50 to 60 contacts on CW, and about 30 to
It is my hope that we will continue to support the BLHA and
operators for their events. So
me of us might even consider jo
following this direction of thinking, It is my hope that the “Sub
and RAK receivers and at least the Collins TCS
-
8 Transmitte
be use
d for these events. I 
know they are not 
practical for today’s SSB 
and Data communications 
that hams use today, But 
for CW, which is about 
all that was used at the 
time of WW2, they would
be just as good today, as 
they were in WWII. They 
were state of the a
rt back
then, and most still 
consider them good rigs 
for CW. 
Once the museum closed
down for the day, the 
activities continued but at 
a much more relaxed
Index page 2 page 3 page 4 Links
pace. The first thing we did was eat dinner, which was prepar
th
e day. We were invited to join the BLHA dinner that evenin
it was a special treat. Like all Submariners before, the BLHA
meal, and this one did not disappoint anyone. 
The dinner was made 
even more special when the crew ate in
one act, as simple as it seems, did more to place me in the mi
like for the men aboard these boats. You really learn that the 
much you like, or dislike him, is an integral part of your life a
bring out in everyone is a camaraderie that obviously builds l
men that served onboard.
Once desert was finished, we did a fire an
d safety walk through
flashlights and fire extinguishers are, how to open and close t
duct through out the boat, as well as learning about all sorts o
the boat.
 It was good for me to take that walk, as it allowed m
that our radio equipment was causing. 
It seems that when the original cabling was installed for the to
down the hallway over the off
icer’s quarters, and to get it tho
compartments, the rotor cable was routed thought the ventila
were preventing the fire damper doors from closing. 
Shortly thereafter, the guys from the sub
-
clu
b removed the ca
the boat, fixing the fire safety issue and it also cleaned up the
considerable. At the very least, getting this cable moved, save
someone t
ried to close the dampers. But this really could hav
fire.
Later this summer the BLHA is expected to have yet another
hope that you will volunteer to help out during the event. It m
will enjoy it.
Home Page Page 3 Page 4 Links Gallery Contacts page 2
Volume1 Issue 3 June 2011
A Day in the Life:  Batfish Living History Day
Back in February, the Museum hosted the Oklahoma Historical Society’s “Batfish Living
History Association” (BLHA), which placed re
-
enactors on the boat, each working and telling a 
part of the story of a d
ay in the life of the World War Two Submariner. 
Our club in support of their 
activities manned the radio 
shack during the day. Gary 
W5ODS and myself both 
“dressed the part” to fit in 
with the crew. Gary operated
the radio and ran CW while I 
did mostly a
dministration 
duties like logging and
talking to visitors, which was 
kind of difficult as the radio 
operator sits between the 
guests in the door way, and
the second op position. This 
of course was a distraction to 
Gary, but we both had a lot of 
fun as that
 weekend was also 
the WWDX contest and Gary 
ended up working 50 to 60 contacts on CW, and about 30 to 40 different countries, all on CW.
It is my hope that we will continue to support the BLHA and the museum by providing CW 
operators for their events. So
me of us might even consider joining the BLHA as well. In 
following this direction of thinking, It is my hope that the “Sub Club” will get the original RAL 
and RAK receivers and at least the Collins TCS
-
8 Transmitter up and working, so that they may 
be use
d for these events. I 
know they are not 
practical for today’s SSB 
and Data communications 
that hams use today, But 
for CW, which is about 
all that was used at the 
time of WW2, they would
be just as good today, as 
they were in WWII. They 
were state of the a
rt back
then, and most still 
consider them good rigs 
for CW. 
Once the museum closed
down for the day, the 
activities continued but at 
a much more relaxed
Index page 2 page 3 page 4 Links Pics Contacts
pace. The first thing we did was eat dinner, which was prepared by the crew in the galley, during
th
e day. We were invited to join the BLHA dinner that evening, and I am glad that I accepted, as 
it was a special treat. Like all Submariners before, the BLHA crew knows how to enjoy a good
meal, and this one did not disappoint anyone. 
The dinner was made 
even more special when the crew ate in the crew’s mess on the boat. This 
one act, as simple as it seems, did more to place me in the mindset of what life must have been 
like for the men aboard these boats. You really learn that the guy next to you, no matt
er how
much you like, or dislike him, is an integral part of your life at every level. What it seems to 
bring out in everyone is a camaraderie that obviously builds lifelong relationships among the 
men that served onboard.
After Dinner, and its clean up,
 the 
BLHA relocated to the meeting
room of the museum and held a 
meeting that also doubled as a 
training seminar that I sat in on. I 
am glad I joined them as a era 
appropriate desert was severed, 
Orange Crush Floats! Ice cream 
and Orange Crush soda. I must
 say 
that I wasn’t sure about it when 
they first handed it to me, but I 
enjoyed it immensely, so much so 
that I now have a case of Orange 
Crush under the counter and a 
gallon of vanilla Ice cream in the 
freezer. 
Once desert was finished, we did a fire an
d safety walk through the boat, learning where the 
flashlights and fire extinguishers are, how to open and close the fire dampers in the ventilation 
duct through out the boat, as well as learning about all sorts of miscellaneous equipment onboard
the boat.
 It was good for me to take that walk, as it allowed me to identify a serious safety issue 
that our radio equipment was causing. 
It seems that when the original cabling was installed for the tower’s antenna rotor, it was run 
down the hallway over the off
icer’s quarters, and to get it though the bulkheads between 
compartments, the rotor cable was routed thought the ventilation ducts. The problem is that they 
were preventing the fire damper doors from closing. 
Shortly thereafter, the guys from the sub
-
clu
b removed the cable and re
-
run it on the outside of 
the boat, fixing the fire safety issue and it also cleaned up the control room and officer’s area 
considerable. At the very least, getting this cable moved, saved the cable from getting cut when 
someone t
ried to close the dampers. But this really could have been disastrous had there been a 
fire.
Later this summer the BLHA is expected to have yet another living history day at the boat, and I 
hope that you will volunteer to help out during the event. It mig
ht seem awkward at first, but you
will enjoy it.
Index page 2 page 3 page 4 Links Pics Contacts page 4
I wish to thank the officer’s and crew of the BLHA for their hospitality and for allowing me to 
be a part of their group; I look forward to doing it again sometime soon. If you would like more 
information o
n the BLHA, please check out their website at 
http://www.ss310.com/
Club and Museum Want List
Currently we are looking for florescent lamps and starters for the on board lighting on the 
Batfish. We need
F8T5 Lamps and FS
-
5 Starters. The Bulbs are 12 inc
hes long, and are 8
-
watts 
bulbs. All together, the boat has 72 of these with very few actually working. We probably need
several Ballast transformers, but I am uncertain of the model and type. 
The boat also has 12 lamps that are 20
-
watt lamps and 24 inch
 long and we need a few of those.
Project Completion report
Cushcraft A4S Beam Antenna Rebuild Project
April 16, 2011
After having problems with the feed line, and getting the connectors all repaired, we continued to 
have problems with the Cushcraft A4S 
Beam antenna, particularly with the 20 Meter band. The 
10 and 15 meter bands seemed to be ok as far as SWR went, but 20M was nearly 3:1 at the band
edges and about 2.1:1 at resonance. We were just tuning the antenna with the tuner, but then the 
received st
ations were normally at some odd angel to the direction the antenna was 
pointed……… Way off at times. 
I know it is normal to get stations off the sides, but when we would turn the antenna to point to 
the station, it would then be null
-
ed out.  Clearly, so
mething was wrong.
Saturday April 16 started out very cold, about 35 degrees, and after several days of rain, it was a 
cold, moist breeze at the boat, most all wore coats, hats and gloves at 8am when we started. By 
mid day, it was well into the seventies 
and hotter than anyone ever thought possible. Several, 
including myself, reported sun burns from too much sun, and not enough protection… Lesson 
learned… I hope!
Volume1 Issue 3 June 2011
As Murphy is always a part of any project, 
we started out with a long delay, when the 
keys t
o the pad
-
lock on the tower were not 
the right keys. It took about an hour to 
finally get it opened and to get the tower 
tilted over. 
Once the tower was down, we removed the 
beam from the mast and sent the tower back
up to get it out of the way.  Working
 in 2
man crews, each of the Elements were each 
removed from the boom, and completely 
disassembled and inspected for damage. 
Since the antenna and tower had been reported to 
have fallen to the ground at one time, we expected
to see some damage and repai
rs to the antenna, 
but not to the extent we found. The driven 
element’s mounting block was broken, and fell 
apart, which explained why the antenna element 
was hanging at a 45 degree angle from then others 
when we got there. 
The 4th element, a parasitic 
for 10 M, literally feel 
apart as the element had fractured and broken in 
the mounting. We are lucky it had not fallen off 
the antenna and hit the ground. Upon looking at it, 
it was heavily damaged in the fall and someone 
had used electrical tape to tape t
he element up too hold it better in its mounting. I guess it was 
not fully broken at the time, so it 
was taped. But then through 
years of use, the antenna blowing  
in the wind, the metal fatigued
and broke inside the mounting
sleeve. The only thing holding
the element to the antenna was 
the electrical tape, and its friction 
to the inside of the mounting
sleeve. This required the 
fabrication of an all
-
new element 
for the antenna to go back up. 
John N5TBM and James NN5Q
did a fabulous ad hock
fabrication job o
f the new 10
-
meter element! 
Index page 2 page 3 page 4 Links Pics Contacts
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I wish to thank the officer’s and crew of the BLHA for their 
be a part of their group; I look forward to doing it again som
information o
n the BLHA, please check out their website at 
h
Club and Museum Wan
Currently we are looking for florescent lamps and starters for
Batfish. We need
F8T5 Lamps and FS
-
5 Starters. The Bulbs 
bulbs. All together, the boat has 72 of these with very few ac
several Ballast transformers, but I am uncertain of the model
The boat also has 12 lamps that are 20
-
watt lamps and 24 inc
Project Completion r
Cushcraft A4S Beam Antenna 
April 16, 2011
After having problems with the feed line, and getting the con
have problems with the Cushcraft A4S 
Beam antenna, particul
10 and 15 meter bands seemed to be ok as far as SWR went,
edges and about 2.1:1 at resonance. We were just tuning the 
received st
ations were normally at some odd angel to the dire
pointed……… Way off at times. 
I know it is normal to get stations off the sides, but when we
the station, it would then be null
-
ed out.  Clearly, so
mething
Saturday April 16 started out very cold, about 35 degrees, an
cold, moist breeze at the boat, most all wore coats, hats and
mid day, it was well into the seventies 
and hotter than anyone
including myself, reported sun burns from too much sun, and
learned… I hope!
Volume1 Issue 3 June 2011
As Murph
we starte
keys t
o t
the right
finally ge
tilted ov
Once the
beam fro
up to ge
man crews
removed
disassem
Since the antenna and tower had been reported to 
have fallen to the ground at one time, we expected
to see some damage and repai
rs to the antenna, 
but not to the extent we found. The driven 
element’s mounting block was broken, and fell 
apart, which explained why the antenna element 
was hanging at a 45 degree angle from then others 
when we got there. 
The 4th element, a parasitic 
for 10 M, literally feel 
apart as the element had fractured and broken in 
the mounting. We are lucky it had not fallen off 
the antenna and hit the ground. Upon looking at it, 
it was heavily damaged in the fall and someone 
had used electrical tape to tape t
he element up too hold it bet
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I wish to thank the officer’s and crew of the BLHA for their hospitality and for allowing me to 
be a part of their group; I look forward to doing it again sometime soon. If you would like more 
information o
n the BLHA, please check out their website at 
http://www.ss310.com/
Club and Museum Want List
Currently we are looking for florescent lamps and starters for the on board lighting on the 
Batfish. We need
F8T5 Lamps and FS
-
5 Starters. The Bulbs are 12 inc
hes long, and are 8
-
watts 
bulbs. All together, the boat has 72 of these with very few actually working. We probably need
several Ballast transformers, but I am uncertain of the model and type. 
The boat also has 12 lamps that are 20
-
watt lamps and 24 inch
 long and we need a few of those.
Project Completion report
Cushcraft A4S Beam Antenna Rebuild Project
April 16, 2011
After having problems with the feed line, and getting the connectors all repaired, we continued to
have problems with the Cushcraft A4S 
Beam antenna, particularly with the 20 Meter band. The 
10 and 15 meter bands seemed to be ok as far as SWR went, but 20M was nearly 3:1 at the band
edges and about 2.1:1 at resonance. We were just tuning the antenna with the tuner, but then the
received st
ations were normally at some odd angel to the direction the antenna was 
pointed……… Way off at times. 
I know it is normal to get stations off the sides, but when we would turn the antenna to point to 
the station, it would then be null
-
ed out.  Clearly, so
mething was wrong.
Saturday April 16 started out very cold, about 35 degrees, and after several days of rain, it was a
cold, moist breeze at the boat, most all wore coats, hats and gloves at 8am when we started. By 
mid day, it was well into the seventies 
and hotter than anyone ever thought possible. Several, 
including myself, reported sun burns from too much sun, and not enough protection… Lesson 
learned… I hope!
Volume1 Issue 3 June 2011
As Murphy is always a part of any project, 
we started out with a long delay, when the 
keys t
o the pad
-
lock on the tower were not 
the right keys. It took about an hour to 
finally get it opened and to get the tower 
tilted over. 
Once the tower was down, we removed the 
beam from the mast and sent the tower back
up to get it out of the way.  Working
 in 2
man crews, each of the Elements were each 
removed from the boom, and completely 
disassembled and inspected for damage. 
Since the antenna and tower had been reported to 
have fallen to the ground at one time, we expected
to see some damage and repai
rs to the antenna, 
but not to the extent we found. The driven 
element’s mounting block was broken, and fell 
apart, which explained why the antenna element 
was hanging at a 45 degree angle from then others 
when we got there. 
The 4th element, a parasitic 
for 10 M, literally feel 
apart as the element had fractured and broken in 
the mounting. We are lucky it had not fallen off 
the antenna and hit the ground. Upon looking at it, 
it was heavily damaged in the fall and someone 
had used electrical tape to tape t
he element up too hold it better in its mounting. I guess it was 
not fully broken at the time, so it 
was taped. But then through 
years of use, the antenna blowing  
in the wind, the metal fatigued
and broke inside the mounting
sleeve. The only thing holding
the element to the antenna was 
the electrical tape, and its friction 
to the inside of the mounting
sleeve. This required the 
fabrication of an all
-
new element 
for the antenna to go back up. 
John N5TBM and James NN5Q
did a fabulous ad hock
fabrication job o
f the new 10
-
meter element! 
Index page 2 page 3 page 4 Links Pics
Index page 2 page 3 page 4 Links Pics Contacts Links
There were a number of pieces that had to be straightened to make the antenna look good when 
in the air. John and James also took care of that part of the project, and did a great job at it.
We also found that the antenna w
as not built “quite right” with some of the elements not being in 
the right spot… Though I am not certain about this, several have speculated that the reflector and
the director were reversed. Now on a 3
-
element antenna, that would not make any difference,
except to point the antenna in the other direction, but with 4 elements, things are different.  The 
4
th
 element is supposed to be between the driven element and the reflector, but somehow, it 
seemed to be mounted between the driven and the director… That 
could explain the disruption of 
the pattern when trying to point to a station. 
While all the Team members disassembled all 
the pieces, Dan W5BM tested each and every 
trap on the antenna to make sure they were on 
frequency and that the traps were properl
paired up and oriented to make sure the antenna 
tuned properly once up in the air. Now there are 
“only” 10 traps on the antenna, but we put that 
poor man through hell, and he had to tests each 
trap 3 or 4 times! He would get done, put his 
equipment up, a
nd then shortly thereafter, he 
would happily drag it all out again to check it 
one more time. He repeated this cycle of events 
several times, but he was always good
-
natured
about it! 
We all learned from Dan’s training on how to check the traps, and while
 at it, he did find that one 
of the traps were “backwards” from the others. We never really figured out why, but luckily we 
were able to replace the trap with another. 
After disassembly, each and every connecting joint of the antenna was sanded down and
 cleaned
with scouring pads and steel wool. While 
reassembling the antenna, each and every joint 
was greased with No
-
Ox, an electrically 
conductive, anti
-
corrosion compound to make 
sure our repairs last. Continuing this train of 
thought, ALL the hardware, 
nuts, bolts, 
washers, hose clamps and muffler clamps were 
replaced with NEW Stainless Steel hardware 
bought from MFJ as a “rebuild” kit. 
Each of the traps were also rebuilt by cleaning
around and replacing the rusted screw that 
makes the outer shield a c
apacitor for the trap, 
and while we were at it, we replaced all the Trap
-
Caps with new caps to keep the water and bugs 
out
--USS OKLAHOMA AND USS BATFISH HANDOUT--
After the boom was disassembled
and cleaned, No
-
Ox was applied
and then reassembled with new
hardware. Each element was 
measured an
d adjusted according
to the manual for the center of the 
band, and the elements were re
-
attached to the boom. Once done, 
with the bolts tight, a crew went 
through again and measured all the 
dimensions again, and made a 
couple of minor adjustment. Then 
a se
cond crew made sure ALL the 
clamps, nuts and bolts were tight as 
a final check.
The final nicety was the application of new end caps for all the elements and also both ends of 
the boom to eliminate the wind from making music with the holes in the elemen
ts, like a drunken 
flutes. To make sure they stay there, each cap was glued in place with “black death” 3M 
automotive weather gasket glue.
The crew then tilted the tower back down and the Beam was stood up on its end and the boom 
was remounted to the mas
t. A long run of temporary / test coax was connected, and then the 
antenna was raised in to position. Testing with the antenna analyzer indicated all was working
properly on all three bands. The tower 
was then lowered again and the main 
run of coax was re
-
attached, and the 
connections were then weather proofed
and cable tied to the boom and tower.
The tower was then raised again and
secured to the mounting post. The head
CW OP, Gary W5ODS, and myself, 
then took the 700 foot walk to the 
radio room of the Ba
tfish and retested
the antenna from there. The results 
were not as great as they were before, 
but they were acceptable.  The antenna 
was connected to the radio and I must 
say the bands were open, even 10 and
15 were hopping, I wanted to get on the air and
call CQ, but there was still more to do, and the 
museum was closing soon. We secured the station and went back to help clean up the work area, 
and pack up to go home.
Volume1 Issue 3 June 2011
While there, Gary also took the ends down on the 40 Meter inverted V antenna that is on
 the 
boat, and he soldered a few extra inches on to the ends to lower the resonate frequency some, to 
help center the antenna in the band, and to help remove the need for an antenna tuner when 
operating CW in 
the lower part of 
the bands. 
ALL in ALL, it 
w
as a very full 
day, far more so 
then dreamed, 
and considering
the issues we 
had, it was very 
impressive that 
it all got done in 
one day! With 
everyone’s hard
work, and about 
$150.00 in new
stainless steel 
parts, we have 
built a nearly 
new antenna 
that with
 any luck should give the club another 15 to 20 years of good service.
A special thank you goes out to all those folks that made a special financial donation to this 
project. Without the financial support of our members, projects like these would not be p
ossible.  
I want to thank a wonderful group of guys for all their help, everyone did more then their
-
fair
-
share of the work to make sure the project was a success and to make sure it was done in just one 
day! The crew consisted of th
e following, but are not listed in any particular order:
Dan, W5BM
Ron, KB5VDB
Mike, AE5QL
John, N5TBM
James, NN5Q
Gary, W5ODS
John, W5EJK
Wade, KF5IF
Thank you guys! Your hard work is very much appreciated!
I would also like to th
ank Courtney, KF5BRC for taking the photos of the project.
Have a suggestion
?
  Have a story idea! Want to write an article of interest?  Just want to have 
your opinion heard? Anything from discussion topics for meetings to projects to newsletter 
items, 
or articles that others would enjoy. Please send an email to
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There were a number of pieces that had to be straightened to
in the air. John and James also took care of that part of the pr
We also found that the antenna w
as not built “quite right” wi
the right spot… Though I am not certain about this, several h
the director were reversed. Now on a 3
-
element antenna, tha
except to point the antenna in the other direction, but with 4
4
th
 element is supposed to be between the driven element and
seemed to be mounted between the driven and the director…
the pattern when trying to point to a station. 
While all the Team members disassembled all 
the pieces, Dan W5BM tested each and every 
trap on the antenna to make sure they were on 
frequency and that the traps were properl
paired up and oriented to make sure the antenna 
tuned properly once up in the air. Now there are 
“only” 10 traps on the antenna, but we put that 
poor man through hell, and he had to tests each 
trap 3 or 4 times! He would get done, put his 
equipment up, a
nd then shortly thereafter, he 
would happily drag it all out again to check it 
one more time. He repeated this cycle of events 
several times, but he was always good
-
natured
about it! 
We all learned from Dan’s training on how to check the traps
of the traps were “backwards” from the others. We never rea
were able to replace the trap with another. 
After disassembly, each and every connecting joint of the ant
with scourin
reassemblin
was greased
conductive,
sure our repa
thought, AL
washers, ho
replaced wi
bought from
Each of the
around and
makes the o
and while we were at it, we replaced all the Trap
-
Caps with n
out
--USS OKLAHOMA AND USS BATFISH HANDOUT--
After the boom was disassembled
and cleaned, No
-
Ox was applied
and then reassembled with new
hardware. Each element was 
measured an
d adjusted according
to the manual for the center of the 
band, and the elements were re
-
attached to the boom. Once done, 
with the bolts tight, a crew went 
through again and measured all the 
dimensions again, and made a 
couple of minor adjustment. Then 
a se
cond crew made sure ALL the 
clamps, nuts and bolts were tight as 
a final check.
The final nicety was the application of new end caps for all t
the boom to eliminate the wind from making music with the 
flutes. To make sure they stay there, each cap was glued in pl
automotive weather gasket glue.
The crew then tilted the tower back down and the Beam was
was remounted to the mas
t. A long run of temporary / test c
antenna was raised in to position. Testing with the antenna a
pr
wa
run
co
an
T
se
C
th
ra
th
we
but
wa
sa
15 were hopping, I wanted to get on the air and
call CQ, but
museum was closing soon. We secured the station and went 
and pack up to go home.
Volume1 Issue 3 June 2011
While there, Gary also took the ends down on the 40 Meter 
boat, and he soldered a few extra inches on to the ends to lo
help center the antenna in the band, and to help remove the n
operating CW in 
the lower part of 
the bands. 
ALL in ALL, it 
w
as a very full 
day, far more so 
then dreamed, 
and considering
the issues we 
had, it was very 
impressive that 
it all got done in 
one day! With 
everyone’s hard
work, and about 
$150.00 in new
stainless steel 
parts, we have 
built a nearly 
new antenna 
that with
 any luck should give the club another 15 to 20 year
A special thank you goes out to all those folks that made a s
project. Without the financial support of our members, proje
I want to thank a wonderful group of guys for all their help,
share of the work to make sure the project was a success an
day! The crew consisted of th
e following, but are not listed
Dan, W5BM
Mike, AE5QL
James, NN5Q
John, W5EJK
Thank you guys! Your hard work is 
I would also like to th
ank Courtney, KF5BRC for ta
Have a suggestion
?
  Have a story idea! Want to write a
your opinion heard? Anything from discussion topics fo
items, 
or articles that others would enjoy. P
Index page 2 page 3 page 4 Links
Home Page Page 3 Page 4 Links Gallery Contacts USS BATFISH AND USS OKLAHOMA AMATEUR RADIO CLUB - 09/05/14 page 3
There were a number of pieces that had to be straightened to make the antenna loo
in the air. John and James also took care of that part of the project, and did a great 
We also found that the antenna w
as not built “quite right” with some of the elemen
the right spot… Though I am not certain about this, several have speculated that th
the director were reversed. Now on a 3
-
element antenna, that would not make any 
except to point the antenna in the other direction, but with 4 elements, things are di
4
th
 element is supposed to be between the driven element and the reflector, but som
seemed to be mounted between the driven and the director… That 
could explain th
the pattern when trying to point to a station. 
While all the Team members disassembled all 
the pieces, Dan W5BM tested each and every 
trap on the antenna to make sure they were on 
frequency and that the traps were properl
paired up and oriented to make sure the antenna 
tuned properly once up in the air. Now there are 
“only” 10 traps on the antenna, but we put that 
poor man through hell, and he had to tests each 
trap 3 or 4 times! He would get done, put his 
equipment up, a
nd then shortly thereafter, he 
would happily drag it all out again to check it 
one more time. He repeated this cycle of events 
several times, but he was always good
-
natured
about it! 
We all learned from Dan’s training on how to check the traps, and while
 at it, he di
of the traps were “backwards” from the others. We never really figured out why, b
were able to replace the trap with another. 
After disassembly, each and every connecting joint of the antenna was sanded down
with scouring pads and steel wool
reassembling the antenna, each an
was greased with No
-
Ox, an elect
conductive, anti
-
corrosion compo
sure our repairs last. Continuing t
thought, ALL the hardware, 
nuts,
washers, hose clamps and muffler
replaced with NEW Stainless Stee
bought from MFJ as a “rebuild” ki
Each of the traps were also rebuil
around and replacing the rusted sc
makes the outer shield a c
apacitor
and while we were at it, we replaced all the Trap
-
Caps with new caps to keep the wa
out
--USS OKLAHOMA AND USS BATFISH HANDOUT--
After the boom was disassembled
and cleaned, No
-
Ox was applied
and then reassembled with new
hardware. Each element was 
measured an
d adjusted according
to the manual for the center of the 
band, and the elements were re
-
attached to the boom. Once done, 
with the bolts tight, a crew went 
through again and measured all the 
dimensions again, and made a 
couple of minor adjustment. Then 
a se
cond crew made sure ALL the 
clamps, nuts and bolts were tight as 
a final check.
The final nicety was the application of new end caps for all the elements and also b
the boom to eliminate the wind from making music with the holes in the elemen
ts, 
flutes. To make sure they stay there, each cap was glued in place with “black death
automotive weather gasket glue.
The crew then tilted the tower back down and the Beam was stood up on its end a
was remounted to the mas
t. A long run of temporary / test coax was connected, an
antenna was raised in to position. Testing with the antenna analyzer indicated all wa
properly on all three ban
was then lowered again 
run of coax was re
-
attac
connections were then we
and cable tied to the boo
The tower was then rais
secured to the mounting
CW OP, Gary W5ODS,
then took the 700 foot wa
radio room of the Ba
tfis
the antenna from there. 
were not as great as the
but they were acceptabl
was connected to the ra
say the bands were open
15 were hopping, I wanted to get on the air and
call CQ, but there was still more t
museum was closing soon. We secured the station and went back to help clean up
and pack up to go home.
Volume1 Issue 3 June 2011
While there, Gary also took the ends down on the 40 Meter inverted V antenna tha
boat, and he soldered a few extra inches on to the ends to lower the resonate freque
help center the antenna in the band, and to help remove the need for an antenna tun
operating CW in 
the lower part of 
the bands. 
ALL in ALL, it 
w
as a very full 
day, far more so 
then dreamed, 
and considering
the issues we 
had, it was very 
impressive that 
it all got done in 
one day! With 
everyone’s hard
work, and about 
$150.00 in new
stainless steel 
parts, we have 
built a nearly 
new antenna 
that with
 any luck should give the club another 15 to 20 years of good service.
A special thank you goes out to all those folks that made a special financial donatio
project. Without the financial support of our members, projects like these would n
I want to thank a wonderful group of guys for all their help, everyone did more th
share of the work to make sure the project was a success and to make sure it was
day! The crew consisted of th
e following, but are not listed in any particular orde
Dan, W5BM
Ron, KB5VDB
Mike, AE5QL
John, N5TBM
James, NN5Q
Gary, W5ODS
John, W5EJK
Wade, KF5I
Thank you guys! Your hard work is very much appreciated!
I would also like to th
ank Courtney, KF5BRC for taking the photos of the
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your opinion heard? Anything from discussion topics for meetings to projects
items, 
or articles that others would enjoy. Please send an email to
Index page 2 page 3 page 4 Links Pics
GALLERY USS BATFISH AND USS OKLAHOMA AMATEUR RADIO CLUB - 01/07/15 Index page 2 page 3 page 4 Links Pics Contacts
CHECKOUT THE NEW GALLERY AT: HTTP://GALLERY.WW2OK.ORG
Pics
USS BATFISH AND USS OKLAHOMA AMATEUR RADIO CLUB - 09/05/14 Home Page Page 3 Page 4 Links
CHECKOUT THE NEW GALLERY AT: HTTP://GALLERY.WW2OK.ORG
USS BATFISH AND USS OKLAHOMA AMATEUR RADIO CLUB - 09/05/14 Home Page Page 3 Page 4 Links Gallery Contacts
CHECKOUT THE NEW GALLERY AT: HTTP://GALLERY.WW2OK.ORG
Links
CONTACTS USS BATFISH AND USS OKLAHOMA AMATEUR RADIO CLUB - 01/07/15
USS Oklahoma and USS Batfish ARC c/o Muskogee War Memorial P.O.Box 253 Muskogee, OK 74402 United States of America CLUB OFFICERS - Elected 2014 and Trustee email: royce: president@ww2ok.org KE5TC john: vicepresident@ww2ok.org W5EJK mitch: secretary@ww2ok.org KE5HWW gary: treasurer@ww2ok.org W5ODS wade: trustee@ww2ok.org KF5IF www.ww2sub.org www.ww2ok.org
Index page 2 page 3 page 4 Links Pics Contacts
2015 - USS OKLAHOMA AND USS BATFISH AMATEUR RADIO CLUB - WW2OK / WW2SUB
Contacts
Thanks to all the officers, trustee, and members for photos and content for this website.  Special thanks to Don Wilkinson K0EMF for many of the terrific photos on website and  gallery. See QRZ.com for WW2OK and WW2SUB license information, and QSL card  information. Thanks to Wade KF5IF (trustee listed above) for newsletter content. Contact  the secretary (listed above) to submit other photos and ideas for the newsletter.                                    Have a wonderful New Year in 2015. 
USS BATFISH AND USS OKLAHOMA AMATEUR RADIO CLUB - 09/05/14
USS Oklahoma and USS Batfish ARC c/o Muskogee War Memorial P.O.Box 253 Muskogee, OK 74402 United States of America CLUB OFFICERS - Elected 2014 and Trustee email: royce: president@ww2ok.org john: vicepresident@ww2ok.org mitch: secretary@ww2ok.org gary: treasurer@ww2ok.org wade: trustee@ww2ok.org www.ww2sub.org www.ww2ok.org
Home Page Page 3 Page 4 Links
2015 - USS OKLAHOMA AND USS BATFISH AMATEUR RADIO CLUB - WW2OK / WW2SUB
Thanks to all the officers, trustee, and members for photos and content for this website.  Special thanks to Don Wilkinson K0EMF for many of the terrific photos on website and  gallery. See QRZ.com for WW2OK and WW2SUB license information, and QSL card  information. Thanks to Wade KF5IF (trustee listed above) for newsletter content. Contact  the secretary (listed above) to submit other photos and ideas for the newsletter.                                    Have a wonderful New Year in 2015. 
USS BATFISH AND USS OKLAHOMA AMATEUR RADIO CLUB - 09/05/14
USS Oklahoma and USS Batfish ARC c/o Muskogee War Memorial P.O.Box 253 Muskogee, OK 74402 United States of America CLUB OFFICERS - Elected 2014 and Trustee email: royce: president@ww2ok.org KE5TC john: vicepresident@ww2ok.org W5EJK mitch: secretary@ww2ok.org KE5HWW gary: treasurer@ww2ok.org W5ODS wade: trustee@ww2ok.org KF5IF www.ww2sub.org www.ww2ok.org
Home Page Page 3 Page 4 Links Gallery Contacts
2015 - USS OKLAHOMA AND USS BATFISH AMATEUR RADIO CLUB - WW2OK / WW2SUB
Pics
Thanks to all the officers, trustee, and members for photos and content for this website.  Special thanks to Don Wilkinson K0EMF for many of the terrific photos on website and  gallery. See QRZ.com for WW2OK and WW2SUB license information, and QSL card  information. Thanks to Wade KF5IF (trustee listed above) for newsletter content. Contact  the secretary (listed above) to submit other photos and ideas for the newsletter.                                    Have a wonderful New Year in 2015. 
ww2ok